Skip to content

What is it?

The original language that content is created in and from which translation takes place.

Why is it important?

The source language carries the original meaning and intent of a communication, as created by the content author, that is then conveyed in the process of translation.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Source Language"

What is it?

Someone who has naturally used a language from an early age as a primary means of concept formation and communication rather than acquiring the language later in life.

Why is it important?

Being a native speaker implies a high level of fluency in a specific language, and native speakers are often chosen to translate texts into that language based on this assumption.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Native Speaker"

What is it?

The use of more than one language in communication.

Why is it important?

Without multilingualism, there would no localization. In a world where products and services are sold globally, companies must translate and adapt their messages in a way that is locally understood if they want to succeed in the global market.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Multilingual"

What is it?

The ability to speak only one language, including non-verbal languages such as sign languages.

Why is it important?

Language acts as a filter between an individual and the world around them. A monolingual person has only one filter and, therefore, only one perspective for interpreting the world. This has implications for marketing and user experience.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Monolingual"

What is it?

The art and science of planning and directing operations in a global marketplace so that a product or service cannot be distinguished from a local offering. Marshals resources for internationalization, localization, translation, and transcreation for their most efficient and productive use.

Why is it important?

Localization strategy is part of a company’s global content strategy and defines how they adapt their products or services for one or more international markets and what financial, vendor, and technology resources they need to do so.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Localization Strategy"

What is it?

Adaptation of content to make it more meaningful, appropriate, and effective for a particular culture, locale, or market.

Why is it important?

Localization increases the relevance of the content for a particular target audience by ensuring that it meets the needs of the local market. Localization is a US$40 billion industry and growing[GALA 2018].

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Localization (l10n)"

What is it?

The combination of specific geographic location and the language, or dialect, spoken in that particular region.

Why is it important?

Understanding the locale concept is fundamental to succeeding with localization because you may need to create distinct content for two locales, even if the two use the same language. For example, German is the official language in both Germany and Austria. Yet, residents of these two locales frequently use different terms to describe the same thing.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Locale"

What is it?

Leverage means re-using (parts of) a given text, both in content creation and content localization.

Why is it important?

The main goal for all localized content should be to achieve the highest quality, in the shortest time, at the lowest cost. Leverage can help make content more consistent. This increases the quality and makes localization efforts more cost-efficient.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Leverage"

What is it?

In localization, a language pair identifies the combination of one unique source language variant with one unique target language variant.

Why is it important?

Language pairs are a basic unit of translation. The source contains original content, which is then translated into a target language. The pairs are generally expressed with implied translation direction: source before target.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Language Pair"

What is it?

The act of converting verbal (spoken or signed) communication from one language into another.

Why is it important?

Written translation and spoken or signed language interpreting are two very different, but related, professions. Localization specialists source solutions for diverse needs, usually for people who are not specialists in the fields of translation and interpreting. When a requesting party asks for translation services, they might actually need interpreting services instead. For example, a marketer organizing a company event might request translation for the CEO’s presentation. A localization specialist might assume this means translation of written slides, but later finds out the person requesting the service actually needs spoken language interpreters. Because these requests are frequently confused, it’s important to know how to handle them when they occur.

...continue reading "Term of the Week: Interpreting"